6 weird things successful people do

Some of the things that successful people generally seem very counterintuitive. Here are a few things that successful people do that you just might not normally think are prudent:

Look for rejection.

Successful people are often nearly inured to rejection, but they weren’t necessarily born that way. Being able to ignore rejection comes from being used to it and understanding it as simply a part of the journey to success. In order to feel that way about rejection, you have to get used to, so seek it out. And don’t forget, rejection usually comes with a no-holds-barred sort of criticism that can include valuable input you may not get from sources more tuned to giving you positive feedback.

Isolate.

This is especially necessary for successful creative people because having time alone is a big part of the creative process. Even if your job doesn’t particularly require you to rely on your creativity, having time to reflect and to grow your internal validation of your actions is a key part of having the self-confidence associated with being successful.

Confront people.

In order to become successful, you need to be able to call people out when they deserve it. Although it may seem more diplomatic and easier in the short-term to avoid confronting people when possible, passivity is an easy out and in order to be successful you need to be able to stand up to people and confront them when necessary. That doesn’t mean that you need to berate them; you can confront them in a professional manner. Just understand the necessity of confronting people when the situation calls for it.

Ignore the general consensus.

Successful people ignore the general consensus at times and they usually become successful because of their ability to act without being influenced by popular opinion or belief. MLK did it. Gandhi did it. Plenty of successful business tycoons – like Steve Jobs – did it, too.

Don’t work.

Okay, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t work at all; it just means that you should avoid doing work that you can have other people do. Even if there isn’t someone who can do a given task just as well as you can, if you can find someone who can do the task 80 or 90 percent as well, you should delegate.

Self-sabotage.

You should never be so rooted in a way of doing things, in a current product, or in the status quo that you aren’t willing to replace it with something new. Sometimes you have to kill you darlings, as the saying goes, in order to make way for something new.

Can Akdeniz

Can Akdeniz is the author of seven books and founder of Business Hacker, a popular business blog. His books such as Go Nuts, Cool Boss, Happy Company and MBA 2.0 have changed how people think about business, productivity and work.